Oldest living man is 112 years old, had a balcony birthday

112 years old Bob Weighton, from the UK, is now officially acknowledged as the planet’s oldest man. Weighton inherited the title after prior record-holder Chitetsu Watanabe died earlier this year. The living facility where Weighton lives, arranged a balcony birthday event for him and the Guinness World Records team presented him with the record-marking certificate.


The current record for the oldest man ever is Japanese-born Jiroemon Kimura, who died at age 116 in 2013. The present record of the oldest living woman is held by Kane Tanaka, 117.

Bob was born on March 29th 1908, in Kingston-Upon-Hull, Yorkshire and was one of seven children. Today, he has 3 children, 10 grandchildren and 25 great-grandchildren.

When he was asked his secrets for living many years, Weighton advised setting realistic goals and expectations for life: “When you’re young, don’t think about being old,” he said. He also noted that he was never a person to want to climb Everest or sail around the world: “We should all just take the life as it comes along”.

People around the world 3D-printing masks for healthcare professionals and staff

Image: 3Dverkstan

Many people around the world have come together to produce protective medical tools for healthcare professionals and staff on the frontline of COVID-19. An initiative by Jenny Sabin of Cornell University has reached architecture studios, factories, and homes across the world in a very short time. People who don’t know how to help joined the effort and started to print their own masks at their homes. The network, which includes firms that own 3D printers, engineers, designers and software developers, came together on social media to ensure the production of medical parts, tools, and equipment by using the power of 3D printers at home or workplaces, soon coordinated and started production.

Image: 3Dverkstan

After the drawing of the medical equipment was made, the prototype was produced and shared with the people joining the network on social media, the volunteers started to produce protective face shields/masks for the healthcare workers with 3D printers from their homes and companies. Designers, engineers and many more based their products on the open-source design from the Swedish 3D printing firm, 3Dverkstan. The shields can be printed in less than 20 minutes and are made of only two elements: a 3D printed frame and a semi-rigid plastic sheet that can be easily placed on.

While 3D printer owners can join the network through the website, healthcare professionals, hospitals and healthcare organizations can also submit medical parts requests. Sponsors who want to provide rubber, PETG transparent protective plate, and filament support can also be included in the supply network. As manufacturers cannot meet the increasing demand for the mask, this effort and collaboration of people will help immensely to healthcare professionals and staff.


If you want to join this effort, you can find free-to-use files and instructions available here.